Marcel Rodrigues Paes Comic Library

With around 49,000 titles, including veritable treasures from the world of comics, the Marcel Rodrigues Paes Comic Library is an important tool in motivating reading among all members of the public.

  

The collection is free to the public and offers children’s comics, manga, fanzines and the work of independent national authors. There are also examples in English and Spanish, as well as HQ comics for adults.

 
 
 
 
 

Historical collection

The Library houses the first HQ published in Brazil – o Amanaque da Tico Tico, from 1936. There are more than 700 comics sold between 1930 and 1950, some rare, such as hard cover albums of Prince Valiant and Flash Gordon. One of the country’s most important HQ publishers, Editora Brasil-América Ltda. (EBAL), also counts among the collection, with around 50 titles, including several famous super heroes.

Children’s comics

A collection of Monica comics, dating from the year of their launch, 1970, is also available to the public. And there’s more: examples of Disney comics from the 1960s, such as Zé Carioca, Scrooge Mc Duck and Mickey Mouse.

Geek events

A true meeting point for lovers of cartoon art, the comic library regularly holds free workshops and courses, in addition to RPG tables, board games, meetings with players, cosplay contests, cartoon showings, illustration exhibitions and many other activities.

Recognition

The diversity of work carried out here guarantees this attraction the title of most active comic library in the country. The library won the Angelo Agostini Prize on January 30, 2016, awarded by the São Paulo State Association of Comic artists and Cartoonists.

Marcel Rodrigues Paes

The comic library’s collection began with 3000 items, donated by the family of journalist Marcel Rodrigues Paes, after his death at the age of 26, on November 30, 1992. A scholar of stories in comic form, Marcel used to correspond and swap examples with collectors from several states in Brazil. The municipal comic library was inaugurated on December 8, 1992, eight days after his death.